What is the FIM, CCP and UEM?

From: Kevin Meynell

The Fťdťration Internationale de Motorcyclisme (FIM) is the international governing body of two and three-wheeled motor sport. Its membership is comprised of national motor sport organisations (e.g. the ACU in Britain and PZM in Poland) who meet annually in a General Assembly to elect officials, determine the annual budget, approve statutes, create or dissolve FIM bodies, and determine the general policy of the organisation.

There are also a number of FIM Commissions that administer the various motorcycling disciplines. The Commission de Courses sur Pistes (CCP) is responsible for track racing which includes speedway, longtrack, grasstrack and ice racing. It consists of fifteen members (each representing a different country) elected by the General Assembly who meet twice a year. The CCP defines the track racing regulations and runs the respective World Championships.

In 1997, the FIM decided to create continental motorcycle unions to which certain activities would be delegated. The Union Europeťns de Motorcyclisme (UEM) is one such organisation and is responsible for running the various European track racing competitions.

More information can be obtained from the FIM and UEM websites.


What is the format of the World Individual Speedway Championship?

From: Kevin Meynell, Wladyslaw Pietrzak, Marcin Babnis, Thilo Wunderlich & Graham Reeve

The Grand Prix Series was introduced in 1995 after several years of discussion and an additional delay of a year. This replaced the traditional one-off World Final which, the FIM argued, could no longer attract television coverage or sponsorship deals. Attendances were also on the decline and were not helped by the fact that the major countries only staged a World Final once every five years. It was felt that a series would renew spectator interest as the major countries would all stage the equivalent of a World Final each year, and it would be possible to hold a GP in a country that was not previously on the World Final rota.

For 1998, in order to generate wider interest and make the GPs more exciting for television, the number of participants in each round was increased from eighteen to twenty-four and a new controversial knockout format was introduced. These changes were generally well received, and a contract for the television and marketing rights was subsequently signed with Benfield Sports International (BSI). This is reportedly worth USD 5 million over five years, and raises the possibility of the Series expanding beyond Europe.

Indeed, the first Australian GP was held in 2002, and was due to be repeated along with the addition of a New Zealand GP in 2003. However, both events were cancelled after the local organisers ran into financial problems, and the series is now only comprised of nine GPs. These are held from May to October in the Czech Republic, Denmark, Great Britain, Norway, Poland (twice), Slovenia, and Sweden (twice). There is also a qualifying competition for riders looking to compete in the following season's series.

From 2005, the GP Series will be reduced from twenty-four to sixteen participants, and the qualifying rounds will be scrapped. In future, all participants will be nominated by BSI and the GP Permanent Bureau.

Grand Prix Series

Twenty-four riders participate in each GP. For 2004, these are the ten highest finishers in the 2003 GP Series, six qualifiers from the 2003 Qualifying Rounds, six riders nominated by BSI and the GP Permanent Bureau, and two wildcard riders. The wildcard riders are nominated by the GP Permanent Bureau for each GP to ensure that the host nation has at least one rider taking part, and for the purpose of attracting television coverage in certain countries.

The non-qualifying riders from the 2003 GP Challenge are standby reserves in order of their finishing positions. In the event of a rider withdrawing from a GP prior to the day of the meeting, a standby reserve takes their place and assumes the status of a GP rider until the original rider is able to return.

GP riders are allocated a riding number that appears on their race jackets and bikes throughout the series. The final classification from the previous season's competition is used to determine these numbers, starting with the World Champion at No.1, the runner-up at No.2, and so on (except that Nos. 23 and 24 are allocated to the wildcard riders)..

The GP format consists of twenty-five heats divided into three events. Sixteen riders compete in the Pre-Main Event run over twelve heats. Eight riders then progress to the Main Event where they meet eight seeded riders; and which is run over ten heats. Both events use a repechage format that eliminates riders finishing in third or fourth place more than once. However, the eight seeded riders now also compete in the Pre-Main Event where they race for starting gate positions in the Main Event.

Eight riders from the Main Event progress on to the Final Event where they are drawn into Semi-Finals that are run on a straight knockout basis. The top two riders from each Semi-Final compete in the Grand Final. There is no longer any Consolation Final.

The draw positions for the first GP are determined by the riding numbers. For subsequent GPs they are determined by the final placings in the previous GP. The heats are then scheduled as follows:

Heat Red
(Gate A)
Blue
(Gate B)
White
(Gate C)
Y/B
(Gate D)
Pre-Main Event
1: Draw No.9 Draw No.16 Draw No.17 Draw No.24
2: Draw No.10 Draw No.15 Draw No.18 Draw No.23
3: Draw No.11 Draw No.14 Draw No.19 Draw No.22
4: Draw No.12 Draw No.13 Draw No.20 Draw No.21
5: 3rd Heat 1 3rd Heat 3 4th Heat 2 4th Heat 4
6: 3rd Heat 2 3rd Heat 4 4th Heat 1 4th Heat 3
7: 1st Heat 1 1st Heat 3 2nd Heat 2 2nd Heat 4
8: 1st Heat 2 1st Heat 4 2nd Heat 1 2nd Heat 3
9: Draw No.1 Draw No.4 Draw No.5 Draw No.8
10: Draw No.2 Draw No.3 Draw No.6 Draw No.7
11: 3rd Heat 7 4th Heat 8 1st Heat 5 2nd Heat 6
12: 3rd Heat 8 4th Heat 7 1st Heat 6 2nd Heat 5
Main Event
13: 1st Heat 9 4th Heat 10 1st Heat 7 2nd Heat 12
14: 2nd Heat 10 3rd Heat 9 1st Heat 8 2nd Heat 11
15: 2nd Heat 9 3rd Heat 10 2nd Heat 7 1st Heat 12
16: 1st Heat 10 4th Heat 9 2nd Heat 8 1st Heat 11
17: 3rd Heat 13 3rd Heat 15 4th Heat 14 4th Heat 16
18: 3rd Heat 14 3rd Heat 16 4th Heat 13 4th Heat 15
19: 1st Heat 13 1st Heat 15 2nd Heat 14 2nd Heat 16
20: 1st Heat 14 1st Heat 16 2nd Heat 13 2nd Heat 15
21: 3rd Heat 19 4th Heat 20 1st Heat 17 2nd Heat 18
22: 3rd Heat 20 4th Heat 19 1st Heat 18 2nd Heat 17
Final Event
23: Semi-Final 1st Heats 19 & 21, 2nd Heats 20 & 22
24: Semi-Final 1st Heats 20 & 22, 2nd Heats 19 & 21
25: Grand Final 1st Heats 23 & 24, 2nd Heats 23 & 24

In the Pre-Main and Main Events, riders take the starting gate positions indicated. In the Final Event, starting gate positions are drawn by ballot. Gate A is on the inside of the track, whilst Gate D is on the outside.

GP points and prize money are awarded as follows:

Final Placing Points Prize Money
(USD)
1st in Heat 25 25 10,250
2nd in Heat 25 20 7,450
3rd in Heat 25 18 6,250
4th in Heat 25 16 5,750
3rd in Heats 23 & 24 13 5,000
4th in Heats 23 & 24 11 4,400
3rd in Heats 21 & 22 8 3,250
4th in Heats 21 & 22 7 2,850
3rd in Heats 17 & 18 6 2,650
4th in Heats 17 & 18 5 2,600
3rd in Heats 11 & 12 4 1,750
4th in Heats 11 & 12 3 1,700
3rd in Heats 5 & 6 2 1,600
4th in Heats 5 & 6 1 1,600

Where riders are awarded equal points, the rider with the lowest riding number is placed higher for the purpose of determining the draw positions in the next GP.

Points accumulated over all GPs determine the final classification. The rider with the greatest number of points is declared World Champion. In addition, the top eight riders qualify for the 2005 GP Series. Standby reserves or wildcard riders are not taken into consideration when determining the qualifying places.

A runoff is held if two or more riders are tied for 1st, 2nd, 3rd or 8th place. If there are ties for other places, the rider with the lowest riding number is placed higher.

Qualifying Rounds

A qualifying competition is currently held for non-GP riders to determine who will compete in the following season's GP Series. This will no longer be held after 2004.

The structure of the competition is shown below, along with the number of qualifiers from each round.

Qualifying Rd (8Q+1R) \
                       -> Semi-Final (8Q+1R) \
Qualifying Rd (8Q+1R) /                       \
                                               -> Final (2Q)
Qualifying Rd (8Q+1R) \                       /
                       -> Semi-Final (8Q+1R) /
Qualifying Rd (8Q+1R) /

Each qualifying round consists of sixteen competitors and two reserves. See 'What are the rules for Individual Meetings?' for further details on how these rounds are run (the 23-heat format is used).

The top two riders in the Final qualify for 2005 GP Series [a further five riders will be nominated by BSI and the GP Permanent Bureau]. The remaining riders become standby reserves in order of their finishing positions.

At least one rider in each round must be from the host nation (to encourage local interest). Should no home riders qualify for the later rounds by right, the highest-placed rider in the competition is seeded through. In this event, one less rider qualifies from the previous round on the seeded rider's side of the draw.

GP riders may also compete in the qualifying rounds if nominated by their national federations. They therefore have an additional opportunity to re-qualify for the GP Series.

2004 Rider Allocations

QR1 QR2 QR3 QR4 SF1 SF2 Total
Australia (MA) - - 2 1 - - 3
Austria (÷AMTC) - - 2 - - - 2
Belgium (FMB) - - - 1 - - 1
Canada (CMA) 1 - - - - - 1
Croatia (HMS) - 1 - - - - 1
Czech Republic (ACCU) 2 - - 2 1 - 5
Denmark (DMU) 2 1 2 - - 1 6
Finland (SML) 2 - - - - 1 3
France (FFM) - 2 - - - - 2
Germany (DMSB) 2 - - 2 - - 4
Great Britain (ACU) 2 2 2 - - 1 7
Hungary (MAMS) - 1 - 2 - - 3
Italy (FMI) 2 - - - 1 - 3
Latvia (LaMSF) - - 1 - - - 1
Netherlands (KNMV) - 1 - - - - 1
New Zealand (MNZ) - - 1 - - - 1
Norway (NMF) - - - 2 - - 2
Poland (PZM) 2 - 2 2 1 - 7
Russia (MFR) - - 2 - 1 - 3
Slovakia (SMF) - - - 1 - - 1
Slovenia (AMSZ) 1 3 - - - - 4
Sweden (SVEMO) - 2 2 2 - 1 7
Ukraine (FMU) - 1 - - - - 1
USA (AMA) - 2 - 1 - - 3
Track Reserves (FMNR) 2 2 2 2 - - 8

QR1 = Terenzano, QR2 = Krsko, QR3 = Zielona Gora, QR4 = Slany, SF1 = Lonigo, SF2 = Heusden-Zolder


What is the format of the Speedway World Cup?

From: Kevin Meynell, Wladyslaw Pietrzak, Marcin Babnis & Thilo Wunderlich

The Speedway World Cup was inaugurated in 2001 as a replacement for the World Team Speedway Championship. It represented a departure from the traditional format of one-off meetings as a Final Tournament was held in one country for the first time. The aim was to restore the competition to its former prestigious status and was the result of BSI obtaining the television and marketing rights through their contract with the FIM.

The World Team Speedway Championship had itself been created in 1994 following the amalgamation of the World Team Cup and the World Pairs Championship. When the World Individual Speedway Championship was revamped, it became clear that at least one of the team competitions would have make way for the proposed Grand Prix rounds.

The World Team Cup had been established since 1960, but attendances had continually declined throughout the Nineties. It was also felt that the Four Team Tournament format meant smaller nations had difficulty fielding competitive teams. The World Pairs Championship on the other hand, was much more popular. With seven teams in each round, it could attract seven groups of supporters and the format also facilitated proper team racing. With the introduction of reserves from 1991 (after the 1990 Final was reduced to a farce when both Great Britain and Germany lost a rider early in the meeting), the title World Pairs Championship had become a bit of a misnomer anyway. As a result, the pairs format was retained for the new team competition, but the system of qualifying rounds was based on that used for the World Team Cup.

The new competition was generally considered to be an improvement, but it did not prove popular with some of the major nations who felt the enhanced pairs format was not a true team championship. In addition, the refusal of many top riders to participate in the 1996 event as a protest over the introduction of solid block tyres, meant the competition was somewhat devalued. As a consequence, Australia, Great Britain and the USA withdrew from the subsequent competitions in 1997 and 1998.

These problems were acknowledged and another new format was introduced in 1999. This increased the number of riders in each team, yet still retained the advantages of the pairs format. It lasted for two seasons with some success until the Speedway World Cup was introduced as part of the FIM-BSI agreement.

The competition is held annually, with the Final Tournament being hosted by Great Britain in 2004. The Final Tournament now only features eight teams instead of twelve, with the top six teams from the previous competition being seeded directly to this stage. A further eight teams are drawn into two Preliminary Rounds which are each held as a single meeting in different countries. The winners of these rounds qualify for the Final Tournament.

Qualifying Round 1: Finland, Germany, Italy, Latvia (at Lonigo)
Qualifying Round 2: Austria, Hungary, Russia, Slovenia (at Gyula)

The Final Tournament consists of four meetings held over a week. The eight qualified teams are drawn into two Qualifying Rounds. The top team in each round progresses directly to the Final, with the second and third placed teams entering the Race-Off. The top two teams in this round then also progress to the Final.

Semi-Final 1: Great Britain, Poland, Sweden, Winner of Qualifying Round 1 (at Eastbourne)
Semi-Final 2: Australia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Winner of Qualifying Round 2 (at Eastbourne)

Each round involves four teams of five riders who are numbered 1 to 5, with no reserves. Team A wears the red helmet colour, Team B wears the blue helmet colour, Team C wears the white helmet colour, whilst Team D wears the yellow/black helmet colour.

The heat format is determined as follows:

Heat Gate A Gate B Gate C Gate D
1: B1 C1 A1 D1
2: A2 B2 C2 D2
3: A3 C3 D3 B3
4: B4 C4 D4 A4
5: D5 C5 A5 B5
6: B5 D3 C4 A1
7: B1 D4 C5 A2
8: B2 A3 D5 C1
9: A4 B3 D1 C2
10: D2 C3 B4 A5
11: C3 A1 B2 D4
12: B3 C4 A2 D5
13: C5 D1 A3 B4
14: C1 B5 A4 D2
15: A5 C2 B1 D3
16: A1 D2 B3 C5
17: A2 D3 B4 C1
18: C2 A3 D4 B5
19: A4 D5 C3 B1
20: D1 A5 B2 C4
21: C2 B4 A1 D5
22: D1 A2 B5 C3
23: C4 B1 D2 A3
24: D3 A4 C5 B2
25: D4 B3 C1 A5

Riders take the starting gate positions indicated. Gate A is on the inside of the track, whilst Gate D is on the outside.

No rider is required to take a minimum number of rides.

A team behind by six or more points may substitute a programmed rider with any other rider in the team, provided each rider is only used as a tactical substitute or joker once. A substitute rider takes the helmet colour and starting gate position of the replaced rider.

Subject to the above conditions, a team may also nominate a joker in one heat per meeting. The joker may either be a programmed rider (provided they have not already ridden as a tactical substitute) or a tactical substitute, and any points they score are doubled.

Race points scored over all heats are used to determine the final placings. Where two or more teams are tied for a place, each team nominates a rider for a runoff.


What is the format of the World Junior Speedway Championship?

From: Kevin Meynell, Wladyslaw Pietrzak & Graham Reeve

The World Junior Speedway Championship is an individual competition for riders under the age of twenty-one. In order to be eligible, a rider must be at least sixteen on the date of the first meeting, and under twenty-one on 1 January in the year of the competition.

This competition is held annually between May and September. The current structure of the competition is shown below, along with the number of qualifiers from each round.

Scandinavian Rd (6Q+1R) -+
                         |
  Qualifying Rd (6Q+1R) -+-> Semi-Final (8Q+1R) \
                         |                       -> Final
  Qualifying Rd (6Q+1R) -+-> Semi-Final (8Q+1R) /
                         |
  Qualifying Rd (6Q+1R) -+

Each round consists of sixteen competitors and two reserves. See 'What are the rules for Individual Meetings?' for further details on how these rounds are run (the 23-heat format is used).

The Final of this competition is usually held in a country that does not stage a Grand Prix or a World Team Championship Final.

At least one rider in each round must be from the host nation (to encourage local interest). Should no home riders qualify for the Final by right, the highest-placed rider in the qualifying rounds is seeded through. In this event, one less rider qualifies from the Semi-Final on the seeded rider's side of the draw.

2004 Rider Allocations

ScR QR1 QR2 QR3 SF1 SF2 Total
Australia (MA) - 1 2 - - - 3
Austria (÷AMTC) - 1 - - 1 - 2
Canada (CMA) - 1 - - - - 1
Croatia (HMS) - - 1 - - - 1
Czech Republic (ACCU) - 1 - 1 1 - 3
Denmark (DMU) 5 - - - - 1 6
Finland (SML) 3 - - - - - 3
France (FFM) - - - 2 - - 2
Germany (DSMB) - - 2 3 - 1 6
Great Britain (ACU) - 3 2 3 1 - 9
Hungary (MAMS) - 2 - - - - 2
Italy (FMI) - - - 2 - - 2
Latvia (LaMSF) - - 1 - - - 1
Netherlands (KNMV) - - - 1 - - 1
New Zealand (MNZ) - 1 - - - - 1
Norway (NMF) 3 - - - - - 3
Poland (PZM) - 3 3 - - 1 7
Russia (MFR) - - 2 - - - 2
Slovakia (SMF) - 1 - - - - 1
Slovenia (AMSZ) - - 2 2 - - 4
South Africa (MSA) - 1 - - - - 1
Sweden (SVEMO) 5 - - - 1 1 7
Ukraine (FMU) - - 1 - - - 1
USA (AMA) - 1 - 2 - - 3
Track Reserves (FMNR) 2 2 2 2 - - 8

ScR = Varkaus, QR1 = Rawicz, QR2 = Daugavpils, QR3 = Abensburg, SF1 = Wiener Neustadt, SF2 = Vetlanda


What is the format of the World Longtrack Championship?

From: Kevin Meynell, Wladyslaw Pietrzak, Marcin Babnis, Thilo Wunderlich & Graham Reeve

The World Longtrack Championship (formerly known as the World Long and Grass Track Championship) is an individual competition that combines the disciplines of longtrack and grasstrack. There were originally separate competitions for longtrack and grasstrack, but these were amalgamated in 1997.

The European Grasstrack Championship had always been overshadowed by the original World Longtrack Championship despite the fact that the majority of riders competed in both disciplines. Until 1994, riders could not enter both competitions which meant the top riders usually opted for the higher profile longtrack. Unfortunately, the lack of such riders in the grasstrack competition meant many clubs staged meetings at a loss.

In 1994, the restriction on riders competing in both championships was removed, but this did little to raise the appeal of the European Grasstrack Championship which was still viewed as a second-class competition by fans and riders alike. The World Longtrack Championship on the other hand, had always remained popular, but suffered from a lack of FIM-approved tracks. As a consequence, the same tracks staged rounds every year and the majority of those were in Germany.

It was decided therefore, that a combined competition with a Grand Prix style format should replace the two separate championships. Not only would this allow non-longtrack countries to stage rounds featuring the top riders, it would allow a wider variety of tracks to be used.

The competition is held annually between May and September and consists of a number of qualifying rounds culminating in five final rounds; at least two of which are held on longtracks, and two on grasstracks. The Qualifying Rounds are held on a mixture of longtracks and grasstracks (although predominantly on grasstracks it would appear).

The current structure of the competition is shown below, along with the number of qualifiers from each round:

Qualifying Rd (9Q+2R) -+-> Semi-Final (9Q) \
                       |                    -> 4 Final Rounds
Qualifying Rd (9Q+2R) -+-> Semi-Final (9Q) /

Each round (including the final rounds) consists of eighteen competitors and two reserves. See 'What are the rules for Longtrack/Grasstrack Meetings?' for further details on how these rounds are run.

The top nine riders from each Semi-Final qualify for the Final Rounds, with the non-qualifying riders becoming standby reserves in order of their finishing positions. In the event of a rider withdrawing from a Final Round prior to the day of the meeting, a standby reserve is called-up to ensure that sufficient riders are always present. A standby reserve assumes the status of a qualified rider until the original rider is able to return.

Only sixteen riders are automatically scheduled to start each Final Round. The two remaining places are determined by a pre-meeting runoff held between the two lowest-ranked qualified riders and four wildcard riders nominated by the host nation. However, the highest-placed wildcard rider becomes a scheduled rider (only for that round) regardless of the other placings. The next two highest-placed riders become First and Second Reserve respectively, whilst the two remaining riders are eliminated.

Championship points and prize money are awarded as follows:

Final Placing Points Prize Money
(CHF)
1st in A-Final 25 6,000
2nd in A-Final 20 5,000
3rd in A-Final 18 4,000
4th in A-Final 16 3,800
5th in A-Final 14 3,400
6th in A-Final 13 3,000
1st in B-Final 12 2,900
2nd in B-Final 11 2,500
3rd in B-Final 10 2,000
4th in B-Final 9 1,900
5th in B-Final 8 1,850
6th in B-Final 7 1,750
1st in C-Final 6 1,600
2nd in C-Final 5 1,500
3rd in C-Final 4 1,400
4th in C-Final 3 1,300
5th in C-Final 2 1,000
6th in C-Final 1 1,000
Other riders - 1,000

Where two or more riders fail to finish in a final, the rider completing the least distance is placed lower. Excluded riders however, are automatically placed lower.

Points accumulated over all Final Rounds determine the final classification. The rider with the greatest number of points is declared World Champion.

A runoff is held if two or more riders are tied for 1st, 2nd or 3rd place. Ties for other places are resolved using a countback of event results.

2004 Rider Allocations

QR1 QR2 SF1 SF2 Total
Australia (MA) 2 - - - 2
Austria (÷AMTC) 1 1 - - 2
Belgium (FMB) - 1 - - 1
Czech Republic (ACCU) 1 2 1 1 5
Denmark (DMU) - 1 1 - 2
France (FFM) 3 2 1 2 8
Germany (DSMB) 1 3 2 2 8
Great Britain (ACU) 2 2 2 2 8
Finland (SML) 1 - - - 1
Hungary (MAMS) 1 - - - 1
Italy (FMI) 2 - - - 2
Netherlands (KNMV) 2 2 - 2 6
New Zealand (MNZ) - 2 - - 2
Norway (NMF) 1 - 1 - 2
Russia (MFR) - 2 - - 2
Sweden (SVEMO) 1 - - - 1
Switzerland (FMS) - - 1 - 1
Track Reserves (FMNR) 2 2 - - 4

QR1 = Artiques de Lussac, QR2 = Vechta, SF1 = Parchim, SF2 = Saint Macaire


What is the format of the World Individual Ice Racing Championship?

From: Kevin Meynell, Wladyslaw Pietrzak, Marcin Babnis & Thilo Wunderlich

The World Individual Ice Racing Championship is run with a GP-style format, but all riders entering the competition have a chance to qualify for the Final Rounds in the same season.

A Grand Prix Series had been introduced in 1994, and as with the Speedway Grand Prix Series, the FIM hoped that the new format would attract television coverage and sponsorship deals to enable the sport to broaden it's appeal. Unfortunately, even though attendances were generally good, the high organisational costs and lack of suitable tracks proved problematic. This resulted in the competition reverting back to the traditional two-day Final format in 1997 and 2000. Nevertheless, a compromise format was introduced in 2001 and this appears to have been a success.

The competition is held annually between January and March and consists of a number of qualifying rounds culminating in four final rounds. The current structure of the competition is shown below, along with the number of qualifiers from each round.

Qualifying Rd (8Q+1R) -+
                       +- Semi-Final (9Q) \
Qualifying Rd (8Q+1R) -+                   -> 4 Final Rounds
                       +- Semi-Final (9Q) /
Qualifying Rd (8Q+2R) -+

The Qualifying Rounds and Semi-Finals are staged over one, or more usually two days (depending on expected support and/or weather conditions) and consist of sixteen competitors and two reserves. See 'What are the rules for Individual Meetings? for further details on how each round is run (the 43-heat format is used).

The top nine riders in each Semi-Final qualify for the Final Rounds. The Final Rounds are staged over two days, with a separate event held on each day (i.e. there are eight events in total).

Only sixteen riders are scheduled to start each event. The remaining two riders are First and Second Reserve respectively. At the first event, these are the riders that finished in 9th place in the Semi-Finals. For each subsequent event, the two scheduled riders with the least number of championship points, exchange places with the reserves from the previous event. The intermediate classification determines which of the relegated riders becomes First and Second Reserve.

At least one rider in each Final Round must be from the host nation (to encourage local interest). Should no home riders have qualified by right, the highest-placed rider in the qualifying rounds replaces the rider ranked lowest in the intermediate classification.

A draw is held before each Final Round to determine the riding order of the scheduled competitors for both events. Each event consists of twenty Qualification Heats and four Final Heats. The Qualification Heats are run according to the standard individual format; Heats 1 to 20 for the first event, and Heats 21 to 40 for the second event.

At the conclusion of the Qualification Heats, riders are ranked according to the number of race points scored in order to determine the line-ups for the Final Heats. Where two or more riders are tied on race points, the tie is resolved as follows:

  1. Most wins
  2. Most second places
  3. Highest placing in the previous event

A further four heats are then held as follows:

D-Final: 13th to 16th placed riders
C-Final: 9th to 12th placed riders
B-Final: 5th to 8th placed riders
A-Final: 1st to 4th placed riders

In each Final, the highest scorer has first choice of gate position, the second-highest scorer has second choice of gate position, and so on...

Should a scheduled rider withdraw from an event prior to the start, they are directly replaced by one of the reserves. This reserve becomes a scheduled rider and, if sufficient time remains, a standby reserve is called-up to ensure that two reserves are always present.

The standby reserves are those riders that did not qualify from the Semi-Finals and are selected in order of their finishing positions. They assume the status of a qualified rider until the original rider is able to return.

After the start of an event, the two reserves may alternately take the rides of any incapacitated rider, replace any rider excluded for a starting infringement, or replace any rider excluded for exceeding the two minute time allowance. A reserve may not directly replace a rider in any of the Final Heats, but they may qualify if they score enough race points during the Qualification Heats. Each reserve may ride in a maximum of five Qualification Heats.

Championship points and prize money are awarded as follows:

Final Placing Points Prize Money
(CHF)
1st in A-Final 25 3,300
2nd in A-Final 20 2,530
3rd in A-Final 18 2,200
4th in A-Final 16 1,980
1st in B-Final 14 1,760
2nd in B-Final 13 1,650
3rd in B-Final 12 1,540
4th in B-Final 11 1,430
1st in C-Final 10 1,320
2nd in C-Final 9 1,210
3rd in C-Final 8 1,110
4th in C-Final 7 1,100
1st in D-Final 6 1,100
2nd in D-Final 5 1,100
3rd in D-Final 4 1,100
4th in D-Final 3 990
Other riders - 990

Where two or more riders fail to finish in a final, the rider completing the least distance is placed lower. Excluded riders however, are automatically placed lower.

Points accumulated over all events determine the final classification. The rider with the greatest number of points is declared World Champion.

A runoff is held if two or more riders are tied for 1st, 2nd or 3rd place. Ties for other places are resolved using a countback of event results.

2004 Rider Allocations

QR1 QR2 QR3 SF1 SF2 Total
Austria (÷AMTC) 3 - 1 - - 4
Belarus (BMX) - 2 - - - 2
Czech Republic (ACCU) - - 2 1 - 3
Finland (SML) 2 3 3 2 - 10
Germany (DSMB) 2 2 3 - 1 8
Great Britain (ACU) - 1 1 - - 2
Netherlands (KNMV) 2 2 - - - 4
Russia (MFR) 2 2 4 2 - 10
Sweden (SVEMO) 3 3 2 - 2 10
Switzerland (FMS) 2 1 - - - 3
Track Reserves (FMNR) 2 2 2 - - 6

QR1 = Saalfelden, QR2 = Kuusankoski, QR3 = Oulu, SF1 = Lukhovitsy, SF2 = ÷rnskŲldsvik


What is the format of the World Team Ice Racing Championship?

From: Kevin Meynell, Wladyslaw Pietrzak, Marcin Babnis & Thilo Wunderlich

The World Team Ice Racing Championship is held between January and March. It is currently organised as a single seven-team event that may be staged over one or two days (depending on expected support and/or weather conditions).

See 'What are the rules for Pairs meetings' for further details on how this event is run.

2004 Teams: Austria, Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Netherlands, Russia, Sweden (at Inzell)


What is the format of the European Speedway Club Champions Cup?

From: Kevin Meynell, Andrea Geatti, Wladyslaw Pietrzak & Marcin Babnis

The European Speedway Club Champions Cup is a team competition for the winners of national league competitions. It is held annually between May and September, but is not currently supported by Great Britain, Denmark and Sweden (three of the four countries with major leagues).

The structure of the competition is shown below. The groups are loosely determined by results from the previous season.

Final: Representatives of Czech Republic, Hungary, Russia and Slovenia
Winner of Semi-Final (at Ljubljana)
Semi-Final: Representatives of Germany, Latvia, Poland and Ukraine (at Daugavpils)

Each round is held as a single meeting. See 'What are the rules for Four Team Tournaments?' for further details on how Group A is run (the 20-heat format is used), and the rules for the Speedway World Cup for further details on how the Final is run (the five-team format is used).


What is the format of the European Individual Speedway Championship?

From: Kevin Meynell & Andrea Geatti

The European Speedway Championship is held annually between May and September. The current structure of the competition is shown below, along with the number of qualifiers from each round.

                    +- Semi-Final (6Q) ----+
                    |                      |
Qualifying Rd (8Q) -+- Semi-Final (5Q+1R) -+-> Final
                    |                      |
                    +- Semi-Final (5Q+1R) -+

Each round consists of sixteen competitors and two reserves. See 'What are the rules for Individual Meetings?' for further details on how these rounds are run (the 20-heat format is used).

At least one rider in each round must be from the host nation (to encourage local interest). Should no home riders qualify for the Final by right, the highest-placed rider in the competition is seeded through. In this event, one less rider qualifies from the Semi-Final on the seeded rider's side of the draw.

The UEM recommends that riders entered for the World Individual Speedway Championship are not entered for this competition as well.

2004 Rider Allocations

QR SF1 SF2 SF3 Total
Austria (÷AMTC) 1 - - - 1
Belgium (FMB) - - 1 - 1
Croatia (HMS) - - 1 - 1
Czech Republic (ACCU) 2 - 1 2 5
Denmark (DMU) - 6 - - 6
Finland (SML) - 2 - - 2
France (FFM) 1 - 1 - 2
Germany (DMSB) 2 - 1 1 4
Hungary (MAMS) 1 - 2 - 3
Italy (FMI) 1 - 1 - 2
Latvia (LaMSF) 1 - - - 1
Netherlands (KNMV) 1 - 1 - 2
Norway (NMF) - 3 - - 3
Poland (PZM) 2 - 2 3 7
Romania (FRM) - - - 1 1
Russia (MFR) 1 - - 2 3
Slovenia (AMSZ) 2 - 1 1 4
Slovakia (SMF) - - - 1 1
Sweden (SVEMO) - 5 - - 5
Ukraine (FMU) 1 - - 1 2
Track Reserves (FMNR) 2 2 2 2 8

QR = Mseno, SF1 = Elgane, SF2 = Lendava, SF3 = Zarnovica


What is the format of the European Under-19 Speedway Championship?

From: Kevin Meynell, Andrea Geatti, Wladyslaw Pietrzak & Marcin Babnis

The European Under-19 Speedway Championship is an individual competition for riders under the age of nineteen. In order to be eligible, a rider must be at least fifteen on the date of the first meeting, and under nineteen on 1 January in the year of the competition.

This competition is held annually between May and September. The current structure of the competition is shown below, along with the number of qualifiers from each round.

Semi-Final (5Q+1R) -+
                    |
Semi-Final (5Q+1R) -+-> Final
                    |
Semi-Final (6Q) ----+

Each round consists of sixteen competitors and two reserves. See 'What are the rules for Individual Meetings?' for further details on how these rounds are run (the 20-heat format is used).

At least one rider in each round must be from the host nation (to encourage local interest). Should no home riders qualify for the Final by right, the highest-placed rider in the competition is seeded through. In this event, one less rider qualifies from the Semi-Final on the seeded rider's side of the draw.

2004 Rider Allocations

SF1 SF2 SF3 Total
Austria (÷AMTC) - 1 - 1
Croatia (HMS) - - 1 1
Czech Republic (ACCU) - 2 2 4
Denmark (DMU) 6 - - 6
Germany (DMSB) - 2 2 4
Finland (FMI) 2 - - 2
France (FFM) - - 2 2
Hungary (MAMS) - 2 - 2
Italy (FMI) - - 2 2
Latvia (LaMSF) - 1 - 1
Netherlands (KNMV) - - 2 2
Norway (NMF) 2 - - 2
Poland (PZM) - 2 3 5
Romania (FRM) - 1 - 1
Russia (MFR) - 2 - 2
Slovakia (SMF) - 1 - 1
Slovenia (AMSZ) - - 2 2
Sweden (SVEMO) 6 - - 6
Ukraine (FMU) - 2 - 2
Track Reserves (FMNR) 2 2 2 6

SF1 = Outrup, SF2 = Rovno, SF3 = Teterow


What is the format of the European Pairs Speedway Championship?

From: Kevin Meynell & Thilo Wunderlich

The European Pairs Speedway Championship is a new competition for 2004, and aims to provide team competition for smaller countries. It is organised as follows:

Semi-Final (3Q) -+
                 +-> Final
Semi-Final (3Q) -+
Each round consists of seven teams and is held as a single meeting. See 'What are the rules for Pairs Meetings?' for further details on how these rounds are run (team reserves may be nominated).

In the event of there being insufficient teams in either Semi-Final, the host nations must provide additional teams. However, their results are not included in the final classification.

2004 Team Allocations
SF1 SF2 Fnl
Austria (÷AMTC) 1 - -
Croatia (HMS) - 1 -
Czech Republic (ACCU) - 1 -
France (FFM) 1 - -
Germany (DMSB) 1 - -
Hungary (MAMS) - - 1
Italy (FMI) 1 - -
Latvia (LaMSF) - 1 -
Poland (PZM) 1 - -
Russia (MFR) - 1 -
Slovenia (AMSZ) 1 - -
Ukraine (FMU) - 1 -
Track Reserves (FMNR) 1 2 -

SF1 = Terenzano I, SF2 = Lvov UKR, Fnl = Debrecen H


What are rules for the European Solo Grasstrack Championship?

From: Kevin Meynell, Andrea Geatti & Wladyslaw Pietrzak

The European Solo Grasstrack Championship returned in 1999 after an absence of two years. It had been discontinued when the World Long and Grass Track Championship was formed, but it was subsequently felt the combined competition involved too much expense for many grasstrack riders. A smaller version of the original competition has therefore been revived for riders that do not wish to compete on longtracks.

This competition is held between May and September. The current structure of the competition is shown below, along with the number of qualifiers from each round.

Semi-Final (6Q+1R) -+
                    |
Semi-Final (6Q+1R) -+-> Final
                    |
Semi-Final (6Q+1R) -+

Each round consists of eighteen competitors and two reserves. See 'What are the rules for Longtrack/Grasstrack Meetings?' for further details on how these rounds are run.

At least one rider in each round must be from the host nation (to encourage local interest). Should no home riders qualify for the Final by right, the highest-placed rider in the competition is seeded through. In this event, one less rider qualifies from the Semi-Final on the seeded rider's side of the draw.

The UEM recommends that riders entered for the World Longtrack Championship are not entered for this competition as well.

2004 Rider Allocations

SF1 SF2 SF3 Total
Austria (÷AMTC) - 1 - 1
Belgium (FMB) - 2 - 2
Czech Republic (ACCU) 2 2 1 5
Denmark (DMU) 1 - - 1
France (FFM) 3 2 2 7
Germany (DMSB) 4 3 4 11
Great Britain (ACU) 2 3 2 7
Hungary (MAMS) 1 - - 1
Italy (FMI) 2 - - 2
Netherlands (KNMV) 3 3 3 9
Norway (NMK) - 2 - 2
Russia (MFR) - - 1 1
Sweden (SVEMO) - - 2 2
Switzerland (FMS) - - 1 1
Ukraine (FMU) - - 2 2
Track Reserves (FMNR) 2 2 2 6

SF1 = La Reole, SF2 = Folkestone, SF3 = Schwarme


What is the format of the European Sidecar Grasstrack Championship?

From: Kevin Meynell, Andrea Geatti & Wladyslaw Pietrzak

The European Sidecar Grasstrack Championship is the premier competition for 500cc right-handed sidecars. This sidecar class is common in Continental Europe, but the competition does not have World Championship status because Great Britain, Australia and New Zealand predominantly run left-handed sidecars. It would seem that a unified class needs to be agreed before the status of this competition can be upgraded.

This competition is held annually between May and September. The current structure of the competition is shown below, along with the number of qualifiers from each round.

Semi-Final (6Q+1R) \
                    -> Final
Semi-Final (6Q+1R) /

Each round consists of twelve competing crews and two reserve crews. See 'What are the rules for Sidecar Meetings?' for further details on how these rounds are run.

At least one crew in each round must be from the host nation (to encourage local interest). Should no home crews qualify for the Final by right, the highest-placed crew in the Semi-Finals is seeded through. In this event, one less crew qualifies from the Semi-Final on the seeded rider's side of the draw.

2004 Crew Allocations

SF1 SF2 Total
Belgium (FMB) 1 - 1
France (FFM) 1 1 2
Germany (DMSB) 3 4 7
Great Britain (ACU) 3 4 7
Netherlands (KNMV) 4 3 7
Track Reserves (FMNR) 2 2 4

SF1 = Stadskanaal, SF2 = Melsungen


What are rules for the European Individual Ice Racing Championship?

From: Kevin Meynell, Andrea Geatti & Wladyslaw Pietrzak

The European Individual Ice Racing Championship was introduced in 1999. It is currently organised as follows:

Semi-Final (8Q+2R) -> Final

The Semi-Final consists of a single event, whilst the Final is staged over two days. Both rounds consist of sixteen competitors and two reserves. See 'What are the rules for Individual Meetings?' for further details on how each round is run (the 20/40-heat format is used).

2004 Rider Allocations

SF Fnl Total
Belarus (BMX) 1 1 2
Czech Republic (ACCU) 1 - 1
Finland (SML) 1 1 2
Germany (DMSB) 3 1 4
Netherlands (KNMV) 2 - 2
Russia (MFR) 5 3 8
Sweden (SVEMO) 3 2 5
Track Reserves (FMNR) 2 - 2

SF & Fnl = Lukhovitsy


What is the format of the FIM Youth Speedway Gold Trophy?

From: Kevin Meynell

The FIM Youth Speedway Gold Trophy is new competition for 80cc Speedway. In order to be eligible, a rider must be at least twelve on the date of the first meeting, and under sixteen on 1 January in the year of the competition.

It will be organised as a series of meetings staged over two or three days at a single venue. The exact structure of the competition will be decided when the number of entrants are known, but each meeting will consist of sixteen competitors and two reserves. See 'What are the rules for Individual Meetings?' for further details on how these meetings will be run. (the 23-heat format is used)


What is the format of the FIM Youth Grasstrack Gold Trophy?

From: Kevin Meynell

The FIM Youth Speedway Gold Trophy is new competition for 125cc Grasstrack. In order to be eligible, a rider must be at least twelve on the date of the first meeting, and under sixteen on 1 January in the year of the competition.

It will be organised as a series of meetings staged over two or three days at a single venue. The exact structure of the competition will be decided when the number of entrants are known, but each meeting will consist of eighteen competitors and two reserves. See 'What are the rules for Longtrack/Grasstrack Meetings?' for further details on how these rounds will be run.


What determines a rider's nationality?

From: Kevin Meynell

In team competitions, a rider must hold a passport of the nation they are representing. The situation is different for individual competitions as riders may only represent the national motorcycle federation that issued their racing licence. In principle, a rider may hold a licence from any national motorcycle federation.


Where can I obtain a copy of the FIM Regulations?

From: Wladyslaw Pietrzak

Copies of the FIM Regulations may be obtained from:

Fťdťration Internationale de Motorcyclisme
11 route Suisse
1295 Mies
Switzerland

Tel: +41 22 950 9500
Fax: +41 22 950 9501
E-mail: fim@fim.ch

Prices: FIM Annuaire CHF 27, Sporting Code CHF 18, Track Racing Rules CHF 18, Track Racing Technical Rules CHF 18, Standards for Track Racing Circuits CHF 18, Individual Speedway World Championship Grand Prix CHF 18.
Payments may be made to account 285.178.00Y at the Union Bank of Switzerland (Swift UBSWCHZH12A), to postal account 12-1714-8, or by international postal mandate. Add CHF 10 for postage and packing.

They are also available on the FIM Website.


Copyright Notice - Page updated 21/09/2004